Enhance Your Language
kytri:

mecha-absol:

sixpenceee:
Island of the Dolls: south of Mexico, literally an island full of creepy discarded doll parts, supposedly dedicated to the soul of a little girl who drowned
Aokigahara forest: a forest in Japan known as the suicide forest, if you walk around you’ll probably find the bodies of many depressed souls
Lalaurie house: American Horror Story Coven fans, an entire episode was based off of this. It’s a house that belonged to this wicked lady that performed MANY, MANY hideous crimes towards her slaves. Don’t eat while reading what this woman did. 
Catacombs of Paris: underground cemetery which hosts over 6 million bodies, only 1/2 a mile of this immense structure is open to the public. It stretches for 600 km. Here’s a supposed recording of a guy who got lost here
Sedlic Ossuary:  also known as the Church of the Bones in the Czech Republic, holds the bones of more than 40,000 human skeletons, and they’ve all been artistically placed inside this small chapel. It’s haunting, gruesome, and just plain odd.
Abandoned Takakanonuma Amusement Park: located in Japan and built in 1973, this park closed permanently again in 1999. Instead of dissembling everything, they abandoned the grounds. Rumor has it there were several deaths during its first run, so perhaps the ghosts still linger in the park.
Forensic Anthropology Research Center (Body Farm): located in Knoxville, Tennessee, this is where decomposing human remains are studied for forensic science and other purposes. More than 100 bodies are donated to the facility every year, and then they are left there to rot and decompose. 
Tual Sleng: located in Cambodia, it used to be a prison and is now a genocide museum. Horrible torture went on here, over 20,000 people have died. 
Stanley Hotel: it’s located in Colorado, and is the inspiration for Stephen King’s The Shining. You can read about the hauntings here
Poveglia Island: located in Italy, it served as a dumping ground for those who were sick because of the plague. It later served as a mental hospital, where rumor has it the doctor was driven mad by the ghosts and jumped out of a bell tower. It’s now for sale
Overtoun Bridge:  Since the 1950s, dozens of dogs have leapt from the bridge to the waterfalls 50 feet below, at a rate of one every month. The most plausible explanation is that the strong smell of male mink urine, detected in the undergrowth beneath the bridge, has been luring dogs to their death.
Bunny Man Bridge: a bridge in Virginia where there is alleged sites of a man in bunny suit terrorizing people with his axe
Hashima Island: Hashima was used as a coal mining facility between 1887 and 1974. After petroleum replaced coal throughout Japan in the 1960s, Hashima was abandoned, and is now known as “Ghost Island”. What’s really cool is how you can explore this place on google maps!
Tower of London: London’s imposing stone tower is, according to legend, haunted by dozens of regal souls, many of whom met their end within its grey walls. 
Edinburgh Castle: One of Scotland’s most haunted sites, Edinburgh Castle is said to be home to a phantom piper, a headless drummer and a spectral dog. 
Pripayt: an abandoned city in north of Ukraine where every left right after the nuclear disaster
Iulia Hasdeu Castle:  built by Bogdan Petriceicu Hasdeu in Campina, Romania after the death of his 19-year-old daughter, Iulia. Hasdeu dedicated the castle and the rest of his life to Iulia. He became a practitioner of spiritualism in an attempt to reconnect with her spirit, and designed one room in the castle solely for the purposes of these daily spiritual exercises. Its walls are all black. Iulia reportedly haunts the castle still, walking through the courtyard in a white dress and holding daisies. Oh, and she still plays the piano each night.
Hellfire Club: on Montpelier Hill in Ireland. Built as a hunting lodge in 1725 and reportedly became a gathering place for a small group of Dublin elites who met for debauchery and devil worship.
St. Louis Cemetary: Numerous cemeteries dot the landscape but the St. Louis Cemetery is the oldest in the city. While many ghosts are rumored to call this place their home, Marie Laveau, the Voodoo Queen of New Orleans, reigns supreme.
Winchester Mystery House: located in California, the home was originally built by Sarah Winchester.  Sarah tragically lost both her daughter and husband to illness and later sought help from a spiritual advisor to overcome her depression. The medium warned Sarah that the Winchester family had been struck by a terrible curse, and would be haunted by the ghosts of the many deceased killed by the Winchester rifle.  The only way to appease the dead according to the medium, was to build a house for the lost souls… and never stop building.  This house is a result of that.
Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum: Ghosts of Civil War soldiers and former patients are said to be walking through the two and half miles of hallways. Visitors claim to see things move or feel the presence of spirits.
Stepp Cemetery:  Legend has that it was founded by a cult called the Crabbites, who sacrificed small animals.  Another story holds that a mother of an infant who died was so distraught that she went to the cemetery and dug up the child’s body after it was buried.  Grieving, she took her own life. Visitors claim to have seen her ghost, dressed in black, weeping over her daughter’s grave, near the site of an old stump that has since rotted away years ago. 
Moundsville Penitentiary: It is estimated that one thousand inmates died while being incarcerated at this fearsome, Gothic style prison.Today, many ghosts are said to be lurking the halls, but the most famous is the Shadow Man. Visitors have also claimed to see the ghost of a maintenance man who was stabbed to death by prisoners in the basement for snitching to prison guards about inmate activity.
Gettysburg Battlefield: Gettysburg stands the test of time as one of the most haunted places in America. Over 50,000 soldiers from the Union and Confederate armies were killed and their ghosts are still seen and heard today by tourists to the field and town. Visitors also claim to hear the thunder of canons, gunfire and screams and moans of the battle’s victims. 
St. Augustine Lighthouse: The ghosts of this haunted lighthouse are rumored to make their presence known by appearing as creepy shadows and making unexplained noises. Legend has it that the daughters of the Superintendent of Lighthouse Construction drowned, and continue to haunt the building ever since their untimely death.
The Myrtles Plantation: Rumor has it that ten deaths have occurred on the site. One of the most famous involves a slave named Chloe, who was supposedly killed by fellow slaves after an ill-fated attempt to poison another house mistress. Visitors have reported seeing ghostly children on the verandah, a curly-haired woman who mysteriously appears and disappears, and odd hand prints that mysteriously appear in mirrors. One visitor reported a cold spot hovering over her bed while a rattling closet door kept her awake.
Bell Witch Cave: The site where John Bell and his family were tormented by a ghost now known as the Bell Witch is open to brave visitors who wish to explore the spirit world. It’s located in Tennessee. Visitors claim that any object taken from the site is cursed, while many have reported encountering a violent force while on the property. Technology doesn’t work there either, with cameras mysteriously malfunctioning when users try to capture an image.
Jacob’s Well: located in Texas. Jacob’s well is a tunnel opening (12 feet in diameter) in a small perennial spring that goes straight down for about 30 feet before leveling off into a huge underwater tunnel system. At least eight divers having died in this system trying to explore the caves.
Death Zone in Mt. Everest: Lack of oxygen, exhaustion, extreme cold, and climbing hazards all contribute to the high death toll in this zone. Since rescuing or carrying an injured climber back to basecamp is impractical, they are typically left behind to die. About 150 bodies have never been recovered and it’s not uncommon to find corpses near the standard climbing routes. Even experienced climbers have perished in this zone. 
Killing fields in Cambodia: Killing fields were a number of site where at least a million people were killed at the end of Cambodian Civil War by Khmer Rouge. Human bones can still be seen sticking out of the dirt paths. There is huge stupa full of human skulls with holes in them from where they were bludgeoned to death.
Mariana Trench: Mariana Trench is currently the deepest known point on earth. It is deeper than average cruising altitude of commercial airliners and harbors some of the strangest life form known to men. Google some of the creatures. They are not cute at all. 
Door to Hell: The Door to Hell is a natural gas field in Turkmenistan. In 1971, a team of Soviet scientists set up a drilling platform looking for natural gases. The rig collapsed, and fearing the spread of poisonous methane gas, the researchers set the crater on fire hoping it would burn out in a few hours. That was more than 40 years ago. It is still burning today. 
Snake Island: This is an island, which is so densely populated by poisonous snakes the Brazilian Navy has quarantined it and a biologist once said that when on the island you are “never more than three feet from death.” 
Gates of Hell: located in New Jersey, this legendary passageway that leads to a network of underground tunnels and storm sewers, and some say to the lair of the evil one himself. 
Skinwalker Ranch: located in Utah, it is home to many mysterious phenomena such as vanishing and mutilated cattle, sightings of unidentified flying objects or orbs, large animals with piercing red eyes that they say were not injured when struck by bullets, and invisible objects emitting destructive magnetic fields.
That’s all I got so far guys! I included the most well known terrifying places. Feel free to add to this list, in case I missed some special, horrifying place.
The horror doesn’t stop here though. I have lots more masterposts:
masterpost of horror games
masterpost of creepy online games
masterpost of creepy websites
masterpost of gothic/horror novels (yes I link you to a PDF version of the entire book!)
masterpost to make you feel better (when all the horror is too much)
masterpost of creepy wikipedia articles
The following aren’t masterposts, but they have an abundance of information
ways to contact the dead
creepy meaning behind nursery rhymes
creepiest glitch experiences
creepy facts compilation
compilation of horror pranks
paranormal science resources
map of monsters/ghosts/cryptids in the USA
alien abduction experiences
everything on the after-life (science too)
everything on astral projection

you are an incredible person

Rebloggimg for future reference.

kytri:

mecha-absol:

sixpenceee:

  1. Island of the Dolls: south of Mexico, literally an island full of creepy discarded doll parts, supposedly dedicated to the soul of a little girl who drowned
  2. Aokigahara forest: a forest in Japan known as the suicide forest, if you walk around you’ll probably find the bodies of many depressed souls
  3. Lalaurie house: American Horror Story Coven fans, an entire episode was based off of this. It’s a house that belonged to this wicked lady that performed MANY, MANY hideous crimes towards her slaves. Don’t eat while reading what this woman did. 
  4. Catacombs of Paris: underground cemetery which hosts over 6 million bodies, only 1/2 a mile of this immense structure is open to the public. It stretches for 600 km. Here’s a supposed recording of a guy who got lost here
  5. Sedlic Ossuary:  also known as the Church of the Bones in the Czech Republic, holds the bones of more than 40,000 human skeletons, and they’ve all been artistically placed inside this small chapel. It’s haunting, gruesome, and just plain odd.
  6. Abandoned Takakanonuma Amusement Park: located in Japan and built in 1973, this park closed permanently again in 1999. Instead of dissembling everything, they abandoned the grounds. Rumor has it there were several deaths during its first run, so perhaps the ghosts still linger in the park.
  7. Forensic Anthropology Research Center (Body Farm): located in Knoxville, Tennessee, this is where decomposing human remains are studied for forensic science and other purposes. More than 100 bodies are donated to the facility every year, and then they are left there to rot and decompose. 
  8. Tual Sleng: located in Cambodia, it used to be a prison and is now a genocide museum. Horrible torture went on here, over 20,000 people have died. 
  9. Stanley Hotel: it’s located in Colorado, and is the inspiration for Stephen King’s The Shining. You can read about the hauntings here
  10. Poveglia Island: located in Italy, it served as a dumping ground for those who were sick because of the plague. It later served as a mental hospital, where rumor has it the doctor was driven mad by the ghosts and jumped out of a bell tower. It’s now for sale
  11. Overtoun Bridge Since the 1950s, dozens of dogs have leapt from the bridge to the waterfalls 50 feet below, at a rate of one every month. The most plausible explanation is that the strong smell of male mink urine, detected in the undergrowth beneath the bridge, has been luring dogs to their death.
  12. Bunny Man Bridge: a bridge in Virginia where there is alleged sites of a man in bunny suit terrorizing people with his axe
  13. Hashima Island: Hashima was used as a coal mining facility between 1887 and 1974. After petroleum replaced coal throughout Japan in the 1960s, Hashima was abandoned, and is now known as “Ghost Island”. What’s really cool is how you can explore this place on google maps!
  14. Tower of London: London’s imposing stone tower is, according to legend, haunted by dozens of regal souls, many of whom met their end within its grey walls. 
  15. Edinburgh Castle: One of Scotland’s most haunted sites, Edinburgh Castle is said to be home to a phantom piper, a headless drummer and a spectral dog. 
  16. Pripayt: an abandoned city in north of Ukraine where every left right after the nuclear disaster
  17. Iulia Hasdeu Castle built by Bogdan Petriceicu Hasdeu in Campina, Romania after the death of his 19-year-old daughter, Iulia. Hasdeu dedicated the castle and the rest of his life to Iulia. He became a practitioner of spiritualism in an attempt to reconnect with her spirit, and designed one room in the castle solely for the purposes of these daily spiritual exercises. Its walls are all black. Iulia reportedly haunts the castle still, walking through the courtyard in a white dress and holding daisies. Oh, and she still plays the piano each night.
  18. Hellfire Club: on Montpelier Hill in Ireland. Built as a hunting lodge in 1725 and reportedly became a gathering place for a small group of Dublin elites who met for debauchery and devil worship.
  19. St. Louis Cemetary: Numerous cemeteries dot the landscape but the St. Louis Cemetery is the oldest in the city. While many ghosts are rumored to call this place their home, Marie Laveau, the Voodoo Queen of New Orleans, reigns supreme.
  20. Winchester Mystery House: located in California, the home was originally built by Sarah Winchester.  Sarah tragically lost both her daughter and husband to illness and later sought help from a spiritual advisor to overcome her depression. The medium warned Sarah that the Winchester family had been struck by a terrible curse, and would be haunted by the ghosts of the many deceased killed by the Winchester rifle.  The only way to appease the dead according to the medium, was to build a house for the lost souls… and never stop building.  This house is a result of that.
  21. Trans-Allegheny Lunatic AsylumGhosts of Civil War soldiers and former patients are said to be walking through the two and half miles of hallways. Visitors claim to see things move or feel the presence of spirits.
  22. Stepp Cemetery Legend has that it was founded by a cult called the Crabbites, who sacrificed small animals.  Another story holds that a mother of an infant who died was so distraught that she went to the cemetery and dug up the child’s body after it was buried.  Grieving, she took her own life. Visitors claim to have seen her ghost, dressed in black, weeping over her daughter’s grave, near the site of an old stump that has since rotted away years ago. 
  23. Moundsville Penitentiary: It is estimated that one thousand inmates died while being incarcerated at this fearsome, Gothic style prison.Today, many ghosts are said to be lurking the halls, but the most famous is the Shadow Man. Visitors have also claimed to see the ghost of a maintenance man who was stabbed to death by prisoners in the basement for snitching to prison guards about inmate activity.
  24. Gettysburg Battlefield: Gettysburg stands the test of time as one of the most haunted places in America. Over 50,000 soldiers from the Union and Confederate armies were killed and their ghosts are still seen and heard today by tourists to the field and town. Visitors also claim to hear the thunder of canons, gunfire and screams and moans of the battle’s victims. 
  25. St. Augustine LighthouseThe ghosts of this haunted lighthouse are rumored to make their presence known by appearing as creepy shadows and making unexplained noises. Legend has it that the daughters of the Superintendent of Lighthouse Construction drowned, and continue to haunt the building ever since their untimely death.
  26. The Myrtles PlantationRumor has it that ten deaths have occurred on the site. One of the most famous involves a slave named Chloe, who was supposedly killed by fellow slaves after an ill-fated attempt to poison another house mistress. Visitors have reported seeing ghostly children on the verandah, a curly-haired woman who mysteriously appears and disappears, and odd hand prints that mysteriously appear in mirrors. One visitor reported a cold spot hovering over her bed while a rattling closet door kept her awake.
  27. Bell Witch Cave: The site where John Bell and his family were tormented by a ghost now known as the Bell Witch is open to brave visitors who wish to explore the spirit world. It’s located in TennesseeVisitors claim that any object taken from the site is cursed, while many have reported encountering a violent force while on the property. Technology doesn’t work there either, with cameras mysteriously malfunctioning when users try to capture an image.
  28. Jacob’s Well: located in Texas. Jacob’s well is a tunnel opening (12 feet in diameter) in a small perennial spring that goes straight down for about 30 feet before leveling off into a huge underwater tunnel system. At least eight divers having died in this system trying to explore the caves.
  29. Death Zone in Mt. EverestLack of oxygen, exhaustion, extreme cold, and climbing hazards all contribute to the high death toll in this zone. Since rescuing or carrying an injured climber back to basecamp is impractical, they are typically left behind to die. About 150 bodies have never been recovered and it’s not uncommon to find corpses near the standard climbing routes. Even experienced climbers have perished in this zone. 
  30. Killing fields in Cambodia: Killing fields were a number of site where at least a million people were killed at the end of Cambodian Civil War by Khmer Rouge. Human bones can still be seen sticking out of the dirt paths. There is huge stupa full of human skulls with holes in them from where they were bludgeoned to death.
  31. Mariana Trench: Mariana Trench is currently the deepest known point on earth. It is deeper than average cruising altitude of commercial airliners and harbors some of the strangest life form known to men. Google some of the creatures. They are not cute at all. 
  32. Door to Hell: The Door to Hell is a natural gas field in Turkmenistan. In 1971, a team of Soviet scientists set up a drilling platform looking for natural gases. The rig collapsed, and fearing the spread of poisonous methane gas, the researchers set the crater on fire hoping it would burn out in a few hours. That was more than 40 years ago. It is still burning today. 
  33. Snake Island: This is an island, which is so densely populated by poisonous snakes the Brazilian Navy has quarantined it and a biologist once said that when on the island you are “never more than three feet from death.” 
  34. Gates of Hell: located in New Jersey, this legendary passageway that leads to a network of underground tunnels and storm sewers, and some say to the lair of the evil one himself. 
  35. Skinwalker Ranch: located in Utah, it is home to many mysterious phenomena such as vanishing and mutilated cattle, sightings of unidentified flying objects or orbs, large animals with piercing red eyes that they say were not injured when struck by bullets, and invisible objects emitting destructive magnetic fields.

That’s all I got so far guys! I included the most well known terrifying places. Feel free to add to this list, in case I missed some special, horrifying place.

The horror doesn’t stop here though. I have lots more masterposts:

masterpost of horror games

masterpost of creepy online games

masterpost of creepy websites

masterpost of gothic/horror novels (yes I link you to a PDF version of the entire book!)

masterpost to make you feel better (when all the horror is too much)

masterpost of creepy wikipedia articles

The following aren’t masterposts, but they have an abundance of information

ways to contact the dead

creepy meaning behind nursery rhymes

creepiest glitch experiences

creepy facts compilation

compilation of horror pranks

paranormal science resources

map of monsters/ghosts/cryptids in the USA

alien abduction experiences

everything on the after-life (science too)

everything on astral projection

you are an incredible person

Rebloggimg for future reference.

eirstegalkin:

staggotry:

Signal boost for GamePhobias, a wiki-style website dedicated to categorizing games based on content and trigger warnings. Users can either view content warning categories to find games that do and don’t contain the triggering content, or search for specific games to see exactly what content warnings are attached to that title (as well as brief, almost exclusively non-graphic descriptions as to specific scenes/levels containing that content).

It’s a very, very new wiki (IIRC it launched late August) and so its offerings are very paltry right now, and I would seriously encourage anyone with experience with games, wikis, and/or both to contribute however they can.

I’m writing up a review for FFXIV right now, and I seriously encourage anyone who can do this to help out!! This is SUPER helpful to people with triggers and I’m going to use it in the future.

Don’t ignore this, I know gamer culture doesn’t care about mentally ill people but you guys should try to be better than that.

flyawaymax:

learning to draw is like driving on the highway like yeah sure you need to be watching other people but you REALLY need to focus on your own lane and your own destination or youre gonna follow that stupid fucking minivan all the way to tuskegee and then what. you didnt want to go to tuskegee. why did you follow that van look now youre in fucking tuskegee.

pumpkinonline:

Check our our new website!So the for the past few days Malik and I have been working on giving the website a better make-over. It’s still in development but you can check out most of the links. Some things worth checking out- Gallery:In the gallery we separated it into dateable NPCs and there are some characters up there not on our deviantart page.- FAQs:We’ve gotten a ton of questions and now you can check them all out on one place. There is also a search bar so you can type in key words and find it on the website. - Gameplay:A more detail explaination of what you do in the gameCOMING SOON Under Game Features- The Game Map- Dating NPCs- ProfessionsThanks so much for your support more exciting news soon! :DSupport our Kickstarter if you haven’t alreadyPumpkin-Online is a Harvest-Moon / Animal Crossing inspired mmo currently in development by indie game company, Pumpkin Interactive, we need a lot of support to make this happen so please follow, and spread the word about usPLEASE SUPPORT OUR KICKSTARTER! IT ENDS SEPTEMBER 18th.

pumpkinonline:

Check our our new website!

So the for the past few days Malik and I have been working on giving the website a better make-over. It’s still in development but you can check out most of the links. Some things worth checking out

- Gallery:
In the gallery we separated it into dateable NPCs and there are some characters up there not on our deviantart page.

- FAQs:
We’ve gotten a ton of questions and now you can check them all out on one place. There is also a search bar so you can type in key words and find it on the website. 

- Gameplay:
A more detail explaination of what you do in the game

COMING SOON Under Game Features
- The Game Map
- Dating NPCs
- Professions


Thanks so much for your support more exciting news soon! :D
Support our Kickstarter if you haven’t already

image

Pumpkin-Online is a Harvest-Moon / Animal Crossing inspired mmo currently in development by indie game company, Pumpkin Interactive, we need a lot of support to make this happen so please follow, and spread the word about us
PLEASE SUPPORT OUR KICKSTARTER! IT ENDS SEPTEMBER 18th.


ushistoryminuswhiteguys:

Hit the Source: Research, bibliographies, and databases. 
Sources are an interesting thing. If someone throws enough of them at you, you’re inclined to believe that what they’re saying is true, that all the sources are relevant, and that they’re all unbiased and accurate sources. 
This is not always true. Just like the news outlets, some of them have specific biases, or present information in misleading ways. But sources can be incredibly important, and immensely helpful for writing papers. 
Here’s why, as explained by Grinnell:

Citation is important because it is the basis of academics, that is, the pursuit of knowledge. In the academic endeavor, individuals look at evidence and reason about that evidence in their own individual ways. That is, taking what is already known, established, or thought, they use their reasoning power to create new knowledge. In creating this knowledge, they must cite their sources accurately for three main reasons:
Reason One: Because ideas are the currency of academia
Reason Two: Because failing to cite violates the rights of the person who originated the idea. (Implicit or Explicit claims the idea is yours is plagiarism). 
Reason Three: Because academics need to be able to trace the genealogy of ideas 

Read and save the PDF here. I have removed the explanations that follow the reasons for a quick read, but I recommend you go back and read them. It also answers the question: “Doesn’t the ownership of ideas reek of Capitalism?”, and gives a great run-down of citing yourself, citing other people, extended quotations, and laziness in writing.  
In summary: Ideas are valuable, they have ‘ownership’ and ‘credit’ to the people who had them, and tracing how and why ideas change can help you learn. Pretending ideas are of your own invention is plagiarism. 
So what about doing research? People paste long bibliographies and that doesn’t seem to do anything. Why are those needed? 
Bibliographies and Annotated Bibliographies are a list of sources regarding a particular subject or topic - or directly relevant to a particular paper. They may look something like this:

— Screencap of Bibliography: Free People of Color and Creoles of Color
Sometimes, bibliographies are annotated, meaning they give a short description of each entry - perhaps a paragraph of information explaining each source, its usefulness, a summary, or other pertinent information. Annotated bibliographies can cut down on the time you spend trying to determine if a source is relevant for you. 
Purdue OWL gives samples of Annotated Bibliographies here. Here’s a student project from U Michigan that shows an annotated bibliography regarding Chicanos and identity. Here's a much more elaborate annotated bibliography regarding Native American history in Federal Documents. You can see there's a big difference between an extensive annotated bibliography, and a concise one. Both formats, however, can tell you what the bibliography's author thinks of the sources. 
This means that the author of the bibliography may be biased or disregard things that aren’t useful to them, but may be helpful to you! 
The accepted citation format for history and art history is Chicago style, a quick guide can be found here.
Citations tell you: Who wrote or edited something, where it was published, who published it, when it was published, and the title. It can even tell you the volume, edition, and translator. 
When you find a book or journal related to something you’re trying to learn more about, you can look at footnotes, or the bibliography in order to find where they got their information. 
Say I’m looking up slave culture in New Orleans:

Donaldson, Gary A. A Window on Slave Culture: Dances at Congo Square in New Orleans, 1800-1862.” Journal of Negro History 69, no. 2 (Spring 1984): 63-72.

I find this article online, and access it through a database. (I used JStor, in this case.) It was published in 1984, so I already know that anything this paper cites came out in 1984 or before 1984. 
The footnotes (or end notes, in this case, because they came at the end of the paper) tell me where the author got their information:

This author even annotated their endnotes, telling us more information about the sources they used. If any of those end notes seem relevant to me, I can write them down, and look for them later. 
But since this was published in 1984, it might also be helpful to see who has mentioned this paper since 1984 for more current information. 
JStor and Google Scholar (as well as other databases) have helpful buttons like these:


"2 items citing this item"
Other items (written works by the author)
References
and Related Items.

Clicking on “2 items citing this item” gives me a list of things published after the article came out in 1984 that cite this. It actually gives me 3 things when I click on the button:


Pinkster: An Atlantic Creole Festival in a Dutch-American Context
Jeroen Dewulf The Journal of American Folklore Vol. 126, No. 501 (Summer 2013) pp. 245-271 Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/jamerfolk.126.501.0245



"Midnight Scenes and Orgies": Public Narratives of Voodoo in New Orleans and Nineteenth-Century Discourses of White Supremacy Michelle Y. Gordon American Quarterly Vol. 64, No. 4 (December 2012) pp. 767-786 

Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41809523



Enclosure and Run: The Fugitive Recyclopedia of Harryette Mullen’s Writing Robin Tremblay-McGaw MELUS Vol. 35, No. 2, Multi-Ethnic Poetics (SUMMER 2010) pp. 71-94 Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20720704



They were published in 2010, 2012, and 2013, and while they may not all be helpful, this is how you get a good start looking for things that can help you in your research. It’s a bit like a treasure hunt. You have to follow the directions and clues to find the information you need or want. "Scholarly peer review" is a phrase that means that the information you see has been reviewed, critiqued, or tested by other scholars to see if the information holds up. You can also search for reviews of journal articles. 

Check your sources are related to what you want to talk about or are claiming, see if they are legitimate. 


Writing a Thesis Statement - UNC 
Scholarly vs. Non-Scholarly 1 | 2 | 3
Finding Academic Articles
The CRAAP test
Distinguishing among Scholarly, Popular, and Trade Journals
Locating a Scholarly or Professional Journal 
Evaluating Sources
Why Everything Isn’t Available Online and Free
How to Read Citations (video)
Berkeley Primary History Sources
Yale’s Art History & Archaeology source list & Guide
Previous USH-WG Guide

ushistoryminuswhiteguys:

Hit the Source: Research, bibliographies, and databases. 

Sources are an interesting thing. If someone throws enough of them at you, you’re inclined to believe that what they’re saying is true, that all the sources are relevant, and that they’re all unbiased and accurate sources. 

This is not always true. Just like the news outlets, some of them have specific biases, or present information in misleading ways. But sources can be incredibly important, and immensely helpful for writing papers. 

Here’s why, as explained by Grinnell:

Citation is important because it is the basis of academics, that is, the pursuit of knowledge. In the academic endeavor, individuals look at evidence and reason about that evidence in their own individual ways. That is, taking what is already known, established, or thought, they use their reasoning power to create new knowledge. In creating this knowledge, they must cite their sources accurately for three main reasons:

Reason One: Because ideas are the currency of academia

Reason Two: Because failing to cite violates the rights of the person who originated the idea. (Implicit or Explicit claims the idea is yours is plagiarism). 

Reason Three: Because academics need to be able to trace the genealogy of ideas 

Read and save the PDF here. I have removed the explanations that follow the reasons for a quick read, but I recommend you go back and read them. It also answers the question: “Doesn’t the ownership of ideas reek of Capitalism?”, and gives a great run-down of citing yourself, citing other people, extended quotations, and laziness in writing.  

In summary: Ideas are valuable, they have ‘ownership’ and ‘credit’ to the people who had them, and tracing how and why ideas change can help you learn. Pretending ideas are of your own invention is plagiarism. 

So what about doing research? People paste long bibliographies and that doesn’t seem to do anything. Why are those needed? 

Bibliographies and Annotated Bibliographies are a list of sources regarding a particular subject or topic - or directly relevant to a particular paper. They may look something like this:

image

— Screencap of Bibliography: Free People of Color and Creoles of Color

Sometimes, bibliographies are annotated, meaning they give a short description of each entry - perhaps a paragraph of information explaining each source, its usefulness, a summary, or other pertinent information. Annotated bibliographies can cut down on the time you spend trying to determine if a source is relevant for you. 

Purdue OWL gives samples of Annotated Bibliographies here. Here’s a student project from U Michigan that shows an annotated bibliography regarding Chicanos and identity. Here's a much more elaborate annotated bibliography regarding Native American history in Federal Documents. You can see there's a big difference between an extensive annotated bibliography, and a concise one. Both formats, however, can tell you what the bibliography's author thinks of the sources. 

This means that the author of the bibliography may be biased or disregard things that aren’t useful to them, but may be helpful to you! 

The accepted citation format for history and art history is Chicago style, a quick guide can be found here.

Citations tell you: Who wrote or edited something, where it was published, who published it, when it was published, and the title. It can even tell you the volume, edition, and translator. 

When you find a book or journal related to something you’re trying to learn more about, you can look at footnotes, or the bibliography in order to find where they got their information. 

Say I’m looking up slave culture in New Orleans:

Donaldson, Gary A. A Window on Slave Culture: Dances at Congo Square in New Orleans, 1800-1862.” Journal of Negro History 69, no. 2 (Spring 1984): 63-72.

I find this article online, and access it through a database. (I used JStor, in this case.) It was published in 1984, so I already know that anything this paper cites came out in 1984 or before 1984. 

The footnotes (or end notes, in this case, because they came at the end of the paper) tell me where the author got their information:

image

This author even annotated their endnotes, telling us more information about the sources they used. If any of those end notes seem relevant to me, I can write them down, and look for them later. 

But since this was published in 1984, it might also be helpful to see who has mentioned this paper since 1984 for more current information. 

JStor and Google Scholar (as well as other databases) have helpful buttons like these:

image

"2 items citing this item"

Other items (written works by the author)

References

and Related Items.

Clicking on “2 items citing this item” gives me a list of things published after the article came out in 1984 that cite this. It actually gives me 3 things when I click on the button:

pumpkinonline:

We were off to a strong 24hr start but it appears like we’ve flat-lined the past few days. ;__; Granted 30k is a lot. But like I’ve been saying it’s the bare basic to get in all the features we want for Beta. We’re looking for roughly around 1200-1500 backers to get us to that goal. And currently we have 39 backers.  If you’re waiting to donate that’s fine, but we can use a bit of push since, the more backers we get early the higher up we get pushed up on the Kickstarter page, which means more people outside tumblr might see us. Right now we’ve been pushed down on the page. Anything helps even if it’s $1Note If you make a pledge you are not charged until the Kickstarter is successful and only if the Kickstarter is successful. So the money is only withdrawn September 18th.  I’ve been trying to reach out and some of you may have gotten an email from me. We’re trying everything we can to get the word out including contacting some press. fingers crossed we can get at least one major media site to write something about us. Thanks for your support so far I enjoy reading some of nice things said about us. Pumpkin-Online is a Harvest-Moon / Animal Crossing inspired mmo currently in development by indie game company, Pumpkin Interactive, we need a lot of support to make this happen so please follow, and spread the word about usPLEASE SUPPORT OUR KICKSTARTER! IT ENDS SEPTEMBER 18th.

pumpkinonline:

We were off to a strong 24hr start but it appears like we’ve flat-lined the past few days. ;__; Granted 30k is a lot. But like I’ve been saying it’s the bare basic to get in all the features we want for Beta. We’re looking for roughly around 1200-1500 backers to get us to that goal. And currently we have 39 backers.  

If you’re waiting to donate that’s fine, but we can use a bit of push since, the more backers we get early the higher up we get pushed up on the Kickstarter page, which means more people outside tumblr might see us. Right now we’ve been pushed down on the page. Anything helps even if it’s $1

Note 
If you make a pledge you are not charged until the Kickstarter is successful and only if the Kickstarter is successful. So the money is only withdrawn September 18th.
 
I’ve been trying to reach out and some of you may have gotten an email from me. We’re trying everything we can to get the word out including contacting some press. fingers crossed we can get at least one major media site to write something about us. 

Thanks for your support so far I enjoy reading some of nice things said about us. 

image

Pumpkin-Online is a Harvest-Moon / Animal Crossing inspired mmo currently in development by indie game company, Pumpkin Interactive, we need a lot of support to make this happen so please follow, and spread the word about us
PLEASE SUPPORT OUR KICKSTARTER! IT ENDS SEPTEMBER 18th.



costumecommunityservice:

[full size][full size]

Cannot stress how important it is to learn about what you are looking up beyond what it looks like.

A wise someone once said, “Learn something with the goal of being able to explain it later. If you can’t explain it, you haven’t actually learned anything.”

Read This!

no-bucks-for-this-doe:

woofbarkmoo:

I installed an extension that will replace words with other words.  I did the usual change hateful words into something not hateful, but I’ve also changed all uncensored cases of “0therk$n” to “lovely individuals”.

This means that rude people are insulting “lovely individuals”, but it also means that there are lovely individuals promoting their “lovely individuals” blogs, and it just makes me so happy.

If you’re interested, the extension is Word Filter Lite.  You get a list of up to 100 words to replace and 12 sites you can block (yeah, that’s right, add those triggering urls so you’re never tricked into clicking the link again!)  If you get the paid version (which I don’t have, it’s $1.99, I think.) you get an unlimited amount.

I tested a few other extensions and this is the only one that works on Tumblr.  It’s a chrome extension, and I don’t know if there’s an equivalent for any other browsers, so I’m sorry.  I have Firefox so I’ll check there in a little while and see if they have anything good.

Also VERY good for trigger words. I have a number of trigger words replaced with “——-” so that I don’t have to be paranoid about accidentally reading a trigger word.

Copyright Information

wwrites:

Alrighty kiddos.

This is something everyone needs to know. These are copyright laws for the United States  but they apply to digital content (which, if hosted on a US-based site, are subject to U.S. copyright laws).

To summarize a few things:

  • as soon as something is put into a tangible medium, it is copyrighted to its creator
  • that means reposting shit without citing the original artist is not only morally wrong, it is illegal
  • copyright lasts for the life of the creator + 70 years
  • commercial copyright can last for 95 years, and companies are working to get that extended (this is why Disney stuff isn’t in the public domain and probably never will be)
  • there is no such thing as an international copyright that automatically protects your work throughout the world. However, the Berne Convention established that once something is copyrighted in the country of its creator, other countries have to acknowledge that copyright

It’s really important for people to know about copyright laws. Saying “well you shouldn’t post it online if you don’t want it stolen” is wrong. Just because it’s the internet doesn’t mean you can take whatever you want. People have worked hard to create these things, and these things are protected just like any other intellectual property.